Dumped shark was not a great white as initially reported

The dead mako shark, which the Department of Primary Industries initially believed was a protected great white, was found dumped in a car park kilometres from the ocean. Photo: Michael Hibberd

The dead mako shark, which the Department of Primary Industries initially believed was a protected great white, was found dumped in a car park kilometres from the ocean. Photo: Michael Hibberd

A dead shark found dumped in a car park near Wandandian, that officials initially thought was a protected great white, has since been identified as shortfin mako.

Following hundreds of comments claiming the species had been identified incorrectly in Tuesday's online story, the Times again contacted Department of Primary Industries Fisheries scientists who confirmed they had "believed the shark to be a juvenile great white". 

However a spokesperson said on Wednesday that DPI staff had since been provided with a photo showing the full body of the shark in question.

"Based on the colour of the pelvic fin visible, the size and shape of the pectoral fin, plus the slender body of of the shark, DPI scientists believe that the shark is a shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrinchus)," the spokesperson said.

"This species is permitted to be caught by game fishers."

Staff from the National Parks and Wildlife Service, as well as Fisheries NSW are continuing their investigations into the circumstances surrounding the death of the 2.5 metre long shark found in a car park in Corramy National Park near Wandandian Creek south of Nowra.

Information can be reported to the Fisher’s Watch Phone Line on 1800 043 536.

The Times is awaiting more information and photos from the DPI.

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